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Thursday, December 14, 2017

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  • HAVE GUN WILL TRAVEL TOUR

    SCREENING: HIGH SCHOOL THEATER -  SATURDAY OCTOBER 7th @ 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM  HAVE GUN WILL TRAVEL TOUR (9:00 AM - 11:00 AM) - Read More
  • LONE RANGER TOUR

    SCREENING: MUSEUM THEATER -  FRIDAY OCTOBER 6th @ 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM) LONE RANGER TOUR - Immediately Follows Presentation (3:30 PM - 5:30 PM) Read More
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Magazine_2014_front_cover_Small_72_dpiLone Pine In The Movies (2014)

Like its predecessors, the 2013 edition of Lone Pine in the Movies examines vintage films made in and around this sleepy little town nestled among the foothills of California's Sierra Nevada Mountains and  the shadow of majestic Mount Whitney. This all-Westerns issue features a handful of in-depth articles, all profusely illustrated with portraits, scene stills, and poster reproductions from the horse operas under discussion. In an extensive interview, Don Murray (Marilyn Monroe's leading man in Bus Stop) opens up about his long career and especially his offbeat 1958 Western, From Hell to Texas, which was shot in Lone Pine. Another lengthy piece chronicles the making of three classic Randolph Scott films written by Burt Kennedy and directed by Budd Boetticher: The Tall T, Ride Lonesome, and Comanche Station. Billy King reminisces about the trio of late 1930s Hopalong Cassidy pictures filmed in the area in which he appeared opposite William Boyd as the 12-year-old nephew of Buck Peters. Other articles explore the Lone Pine productions of B-Western stars Tom Tyler and Jack Randall. The issue ends with a portfolio of then-and-now photos in which Los Angeles Times photographer Don Kelsen matches old movie stills with contemporary shots. This handsomely printed journal sports a glossy wraparound cover and offers more than a hundred pages with as many illustrations.


Lone_Pine_Magazine_2013_cover_72_320_xLone Pine In The Movies (2013)

Lone Pine in the Movies: Where the Real West Becomes the Reel West

Like its predecessors, the 2013 edition of Lone Pine in the Movies examines vintage films made in and around this sleepy little town nestled among the foothills of California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, in the shadow of majestic Mount Whitney. This all-Westerns issue features a handful of in-depth articles, all profusely illustrated with portraits, scene stills, and poster reproductions from the horse operas under discussion. In an extensive interview, Don Murray (Marilyn Monroe's leading man in Bus Stop) opens up about his long career and especially his offbeat 1958 Western, From Hell to Texas, which was shot in Lone Pine. Another lengthy piece chronicles the making of three classic Randolph Scott oaters written by Burt Kennedy and directed by Budd Boetticher: The Tall T, Ride Lonesome, and Comanche Station. Hopalong Cassidy's first boy sidekick, 12-year-old rodeo star Billy King, reminisces about his trio of 1937-38 Hoppy pictures filmed in the area. Other articles explore the Lone Pine productions of "B"-Western stars Tom Tyler and Jack Randall. The issue ends with a portfolio of then-and-now photos in which Los Angeles Times lenser Don Kelsen matches old movie stills with new shots taken on the same spots for comparison purposes. This handsomely printed journal sports a glossy wraparound cover and offers more than a hundred pages and just as many illustrations.  $12.95 (104 Pages)  BUY NOW

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Lone Pine In The Movies (2012)
Lone Pine in the Movies: Celebrate The Centennials

The latest edition of this award-winning journal, published annually for attendees of the Lone Pine Film Festival, celebrates the centennials of two legendary Hollywood studios: Universal and Paramount. In keeping with the magazine’s theme, each article focuses on films made in and around Lone Pine, the small California town nestled at the base of Mt. Whitney, just a stone’s throw from the picturesque Alabama Hills. The opening piece, discussing Universal silent-era Westerns produced in the area, is followed by lengthy career studies of Thirties cowboy star Ken Maynard and Fifties cowboy star Audie Murphy. There’s also a behind-the-scenes look at the production of TREMORS, Universal’s 1990 sci-fi smash shot in Lone Pine. This is followed by a detailed analysis of THE ROUNDUP (1920), which not only marked Paramount’s first excursion to Lone Pine but is also the earliest extant film lensed in the Alabama Hills. The studio’s many Zane Grey adaptations are also explored in depth, and the issue closes out with a special portfolio of newly shot photos matched to vintage stills from a 1941 Hopalong Cassidy movie released by Paramount. This year’s "Lone Pine in the Movies," like its predecessors, is profusely illustrated with more than 100 vintage stills, posters and lobby cards. At 112 pages in length, it’s a treasure trove of film history that will appeal to casual fans and hard-core aficionados alike. ( $12.95)  BUY NOW

Lone_Pine_in_the_Movies_2011Lone Pine In The Movies (2011)
by James V. D'Arc, Ed Hulse, Chris Langley & Don Miller


Presenting over 100 pages of rare photos and fact-filled articles written by noted film historians  who have chronicled filmmaking in Lone Pine.

One hundred years ago, Leonard Franklin Slye was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. His family later moved to the small hamlet of Duck Run, where they worked a farm that produced a meager living. Young Len wanted a lot more from life, and he eventually got it—as Roy Rogers, King of the Cowboys, hero to millions of American children and a star of both big-screen and small-screen. Roy began his storied career in Lone Pine, where his first starring film—Under Western Stars—was made in early 1938. In two excellent essays by Ed Hulse and Don Miller, we examine in some detail that motion picture and other aspects of his career.

Chris Langley has been contributing to Lone Pine in the Movies since we published the first issue in 2003. From that number we have reprinted by popular demand his groundbreaking article on silent-era director Clarence Badger. Chris is also represented in these pages with his latest essay, an overview of the career of director Lesley Selander, a frequent visitor to Lone Pine whose Westerns shot here include the vehicles of such major Western stars as Buck Jones and Tim Holt, as well as many entries in the Hopalong Cassidy series starring William Boyd.

This year, with his superb article on the film Brigham Young (1940), we enlist in our Writers Brigade a distinguished new contributor., James V. D’Arc. Jim is curator of the BYU Motion Picture Archive, the BYU Film Music Archive and the Arts and Communications Archive, and also runs the BYU Motion Picture Archive Film Series.

Finally, in responses to dozens—perhaps hundreds—of requests we’ve received over the last five years or so, we are including a revised and updated checklist of films made wholly or partially on locations in Lone Pine and the eastern Sierras. It’s a handy reference that will enable you to keep track of the movies you’ve seen, both here at the annual Film Festival and at home on TV or DVD.  ( $12.95)  BUY NOW

 Lone_Pine_in_the_Movies_2010Lone Pine in the Movies (2010)

Over a period of 25 years Republic Pictures produced some of the most action-packed Westerns, serials and adventure films ever made. A number of the best-including Republic's first release, Westward Ho (1935)-were shot in Lone Pine. This jumbo-sized edition of Lone Pine in the Movies pays homage to the studio's output with a group of fact-filled, profusely illustrated articles written by a Who's Who of distinguished film historians including Richard W. Bann, William K. Everson, Ed Hulse, Chris Langley, Don Miller, and Samuel M. Sherman. (108 Pages) BUY NOW

Lone_Pine_in_the_Movies_2009Lone Pine in the Movies (2009)

This lavishly illustrated book celebrates the first 20 years of the Lone Pine Film Festival, which offers informative tours and exclusively shows vintage films shot in the area. The sleepy California community of Lone Pine and the surrounding Alabama Hills, nestled at the foot of Mount Whitney, has been used as a location by filmmakers in hundreds of movies dating back to the silent era. Inside this publication you will find more than 100 pages of rare photographs and comprehensive studies written by noted film historians who have chronicled the filmmaking activities in Lone Pine. Featured are articles covering the rediscovered classic 1943 Republic serial "Daredevils of the West," a tribute to film festival co-founder Dave Holland, a pictorial retrospective of the first 20 festivals by noted photographer Don Kelsen, and much more. A wonderful keepsake for anyone who has or is planning to visit and enjoy the heritage of this majestic cinema location. ( $12.95)  BUY NOW

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Celebrity Guests
Bruce Boxleitner
Diamond Farnsworth
Ben Mankiewicz

Master of Ceremonies

Larry Maurice

Guest Authors & Panelists
Bob Boze Bell
Bruce Davison
Scott Eyman
Ed Faulkner
Larry Floyd
Clifford Happy
Marguerite Happy
Robert Jauregui
John Langellier
Wyatt McCrea
Pat Ommert
William Wellman
Rob Word

 

Panel Moderator
Ed Hulse

Thursday Night Opening Film
Floating Horses: The Life of Casey Tibbs
With Director Justin Koehler

Friday Night Keynote Film
Sergeant Rutledge

Saturday Night Keynote Film
The Cheyenne Social Club

Special Guests
Jay C. Munns
Pianist for Silent Films